Your February 1997 opinion column, "we're not in China, Toto," on China's use of labor vs. machinery raises interesting questions, and the answers may not be unimportant to U.S. labor.
Coal

I cannot believe that the top executives of nearly all our large U.S. power companies are running scared and avoiding investment in new, efficient gas-fired generation facilities due to the deregulation activity of our federal and state governments.
Coal

The June 1999 article, "New Welding Technology Eases Wallpapering," contains some questionable information on wallpapering and implies that the technique is slow, difficult to do and uses alloys that have relatively short service lives.

In your May 1999 humor article on the dangers of bread, you state, as your last fact, that "Most American bread eaters are utterly unable to distinguish between significant scientific fact and meaningless statistical babbling."

In the Opinion Page of August 1998 issue, the Unified Power Flow Controllers were discussed. It was stated that because of the UPFC, for the first time, transmission line operators can direct the flow of large amounts of power over specified transmission paths rather than watching helplessly as it finds its own route.
Emissions

The August 1998 issue of Power Engineering continues the magazine`s important skeptical approach to regulation and supportive approach to free market forces. However, Dr. Zink uses the disturbing phrase "the root cause of supply and transmission problems."
Nuclear

I read your editorials each month with interest. I do not always agree with your views but they do add to my understanding of various subjects. I would like to add my comments to the letter from Michael Gembol published in the June 1998 issue. I differ with the position stated in his letter.
Nuclear

I ran across Michael Gembol`s letter as I read the June issue of Power Engineering. My first reaction was to the letter itself, then my second was to the choice of the editor to include this piece.
Coal

Most turbines, as the article points out, have been protected with gaseous agent systems, which when they operate as intended, will extinguish a fire with little damage and, hence go unreported. Failures are always reported. This gives a skewed picture of their reliability. One of North America`s largest users of gas-type fire suppression systems did a 10-plus-year study of thousands of system operations wherein they were able to document reliability in excess of 95 percent successful suppressio

Your article "Fuel Cells for the Masses" in the January Power Engineering connected to my own experience. My introduction to fuel cells came as part of the Biosatellite project with GE. There they were used not only for the generation of electrical power but also for provisioning of drinking water for the monkeys onboard. This was in the early sixties. At that time, high costs and premature membrane degradation were major problems.