Bloom Energy fuel cells to power 4.2-MW CHP micro plant in South Korea

Bloom Energy will install the first-ever solid oxide fuel cell technology in a planned combined heat and power (CHP) plant to be built in South Korea.

The California-based Bloom Energy’s collaboration with SK ecoplant (formerly SK Engineering and Construction) will stack the fuel-cell servers in a Power Tower format. The utility-scale CHP plant will generate 4.2 MW of electricity at capacity and also capture the thermal energy to provide heat and warm water for the nearby Bukpyung Recreational and Sports Center.

Construction on the project, to be located in Donghae City, is expected to begin later this year.

“We are thrilled to partner with SK ecoplant to bring this innovative and exciting project to life, marking a new milestone for Bloom Energy,” said Venkat Venkataraman, executive vice president and chief technology officer, Bloom Energy. “Not only can we efficiently generate clean and reliable energy for an important utility, Korea East-West Power, but also we are eager and humbled to supply heat to the local community center so that residents can enjoy activities during harsh winter months.”

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Overall, the power generated by Bloom Energy’s fuel-cells will produce 35,000 MWh of clean electricity annually, according to the company.

The SOHC technology converts fuel to electricity via an electrochemical process. Solid fuel cells consist of electrolytes, anodes and cathodes to produce electricity, water and lesser amounts of carbon dioxide.

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