GE turbine selected for H2, gas-fired Tallawarra plant in Australia

Tallawarra A power station
Photo courtesy EnergyAustralia

EnergyAustralia has ordered one of GE’s 9F.05 gas-fired turbines to power the nation’s first gas-hydrogen dual-fuel power plant.

The GE turbine will be installed at the Tallawarra B Power Station in New South Wales, Australia. The plant is intended to reduce emissions and replace capacity being lost when the 1.560-MW Liddell coal-fired plant in closed by 2023.

“Our new open-cycle, hydrogen and gas capable turbine will provide firm capacity on a continuous basis and paves the way for additional cleaner energy sources to enter the system,” said Catherine Tanna, Managing Director of EnergyAustralia. “We are leading the sector by building the first net zero carbon emissions hydrogen and gas capable power plant in New South Wales.”

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The Tallawarra B power plant will operate with high operational flexibility as a “peaker” plant–firing up rapidly when needed to stabilize the power grid during demand peaks–and it will utilize partial loads of hydrogen to decrease its emissions footprint.

“Our new open-cycle, hydrogen and gas capable turbine will provide firm capacity on a continuous basis and paves the way for additional cleaner energy sources to enter the system,” said Catherine Tanna, Managing Director of EnergyAustralia. “We are leading the sector by building the first net zero carbon emissions hydrogen and gas capable power plant in New South Wales.”

The 316-MW Tallawarra B Power Station will be built in consortium with the Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) company Clough and will be adjacent to EnergyAustralia’s existing Tallawarra A 435 MW gas plant, (pictured at top) located in Yallah on the western shore of Lake Illawarra in the state of New South Wales (NSW)–approximately eight miles southwest of the city of Wollongong.

With the forthcoming closure of the Liddell coal-fired power station, the Australian Federal government called on the private sector to identify alternative solutions to deliver up to 1,000 megawatts of dispatchable power to ensure a reliable transition to lower-carbon energy future.

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