Siemens supplying gas, steam turbines for Taiwanese CCGT LNG project

Image credit Siemens Energy

Taiwan is taking another major step in its move from coal and nuclear with plans to build a 1.1-GW combined cycle gas turbine plant powered by re-gasified liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Siemens Energy and Taiwanese engineering and construction (EPC) firm CTCI Corp. are partnering on the Sun Ba Power Phase II project in Tainan, southern Taiwan.

“We are very excited to contribute to the energy transition of Taiwan with our leading HL-class gas turbine technology,” said Karim Amin, Executive Vice President Generation at Siemens Energy. “This technology offers substantial value for Sun Ba Power Corporation’s project, as it combines high power density with world class efficiencies. As a result, a large amount of electricity can be produced at the lowest possible cost while driving significant CO2 reductions at the same time.”

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Taiwan is one of the world’s leaders in manufacturing of semiconductors, now suffering supply chain constraints globally and resulting in delays of many products including automobiles. Taiwan does not produce natural gas domestically so will import LNG to be re-gasified for power generation.

The Sun Ba Phase II plant is expected to be completed and operational by mid-2024. Siemens Energy will supply the plant’s power island, consisting of two SGT6-9000HL gas turbines, one SST-5000 steam turbine, three SGen6-2000P generators, two heat recovery steam generators, and the SPPA-T3000 control system.

The service contract includes long-term service over 25 years for both gas turbines, the generators, the steam turbine, and the heat recovery steam generators. It also includes an option for digital service solutions. CTCI Corporation is responsible for the construction and installation, and whole EPC work of the balance of plant.

Taiwan’s energy firm are increasingly contracting for LNG delivered by global providers. In 2018, Taiwan’s CPC Corp. signed a 25-year supply deal with U.S. LNG producer Cheniere Energy, while a 2021 deal with Qatar Petroleum calls for a 15-year delivery contract.

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