Uncategorized

Power Engineering Photo of the Day

01 / 49

Coal-Fired Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">While some critics say the coal industry is on its way out, many in the business say the exact opposite. Though new regulations will impose stricter limits on coal-fired power plants, many believe coal is and will be a very important and necessary part of the energy mix now and in the future. Technological innovations and cleaner burning plants - such as Duke Energy's Edwardsport project, Southern's Kemper County project, and Saskatchewan Power's Boundary Dam project - are just a few examples of how the industry is not only adapting but pushing forward.<br><i> Photo courtesy: American Electric Power</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-7/features/executives-discuss-the-future-of-coal-in-north-america.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Executives Discuss the Future of Coal in North America</a></p> </div>

02 / 49

Boundary Dam CCS Project

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">After 41 months of construction, the opening of the Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Storage Project marked a major milestone in the battle against climate change. The $1.35 billion project in Saskatchewan is the first large-scale power plant in the world to use CCS technology… Ninety percent of Unit 3’s CO<sub>2</sub> emissions are removed, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 1 million tons a year. During construction, which lasted three long winters, more than 60 contracting companies and several hundred subcontractors worked on the project. At the peak of construction, the project employed 1,700 workers. The entire world is watching SaskPower’s Boundary Dam project to determine if CCS can be an effective and affordable tool to combat climate change. In addition to sharply lower emissions, the CO<sub>2</sub> from Boundary Dam’s Unit 3 is stored underground and will be used for enhanced oil recovery. CO<sub>2</sub> emissions from Unit 3 are well below Canada’s standards for greenhouse gas emissions and well below the emission levels of the best gas-fired power plant. Congratulations to SaskPower for completing this challenging project and demonstrating how CCS technology can turn coal-fired power into an effective tool to reduce climate change.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/10/saskpower-successfully-captures-carbon-dioxide-delivers-to-oilfield.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">SaskPower successfully captures carbon dioxide, delivers to oilfield</a></p> </div>

03 / 49

Cape Canaveral

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">Some of America’s greatest innovations were realized at Cape Canaveral, home of the Kennedy Space Center. It’s fitting that this historic site is now home to one of the most advanced power plants in the world. Florida Power & Light’s Cape Canaveral Next Generation Clean Energy Center, a 1,200-MW combined cycle plant equipped with three SGT6-8000H turbines from Siemens, began commercial operation April 24, 2013. The plant was recognized by Power Engineering magazine as the Project of the Year for gas-fired projects in 2013.<br /><em> Photo courtesy: Florida Power & Light</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/features/a-report-on-combined-cycle-projects-in-north-america.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Report on Combined Cycle Projects in North America</a></p> </div>

04 / 49

Colusa Generation Station

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The Colusa Generation Station, about 70 miles northwest of Sacramento, California, began generating power in December 2010. The two-unit, combined cycle power plant has a generation capacity of 660 MW, enough to power more than half a million homes in Northern California. The plant is loaded with environmental technologies, including a "dry cooling" system that uses 97 percent less water than a conventional cooling system. What's more, the plant is equipped with a Zero Liquid Discharge system, which recycles and cleans wastewater for reuse throughout the plant. The ZLD equipment was supplied by Aquatech under a contract with Gemma Power Systems, the project's primary contractor. Pacific Gas & Electric owns and operates the plant.<br><i> Photo courtesy: PG&E</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/features/a-report-on-combined-cycle-projects-in-north-america.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Report on Combined Cycle Projects in North America</a></p> </div>

05 / 49

Cybersecurity

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) has recognized the importance of security for years, and continues to refine, with industry input, its Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) reliability standards. And earlier this year, the Obama administration announced the “Cybersecurity Framework” ¬– a voluntary guide targeted to organizations in the critical infrastructure community and developed by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-10/departments/industry-watch/countering-cyber-threats-internal-resources-might-not-be-enough.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Countering Cyber Threats: Internal Resources Might Not be Enough</a></p> </div>

06 / 49

Dry Sorbent Injection

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Dry sorbent injection systems have been in service for more than 20 years at coal-fired stations, providing an effective tool for reducing sulfur dioxide acid gas emissions. New regulations have restored new interest in DSI as a low capital-cost, multi-pollutant control solution. NAES Corp. recently installed a new DSI system at a coal-fired station in the Midwest.<br> <i>Photo courtesy: NAES</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-9/features/a-low-cost-pollutant-control-solution-installing-a-dsi-system-at-a-midwest-utility.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Low-Cost Pollutant Control Solution: Installing a DSI System at a Midwest Utility</a></p> </div>

07 / 49

Edwardsport

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Duke Energy’s Edwardsport coal gasification power plant in Indiana began commercial operations in June 2013. The 618-MW plant converts coal into a cleaner-burnig syngas. Carbon dioxide and other impurities are then stripped from the gaseous fuel before it is burned. The resulting emissions are as low as those produced by a power plant fueled with natural gas. </p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-11/departments1/power-plant-profile/edwardsport-power-plant-makes-history.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Edwardsport Power Plant Makes History</a></p> </div>

08 / 49

El Segundo

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">If you could snap a picture of the future of power generation, this is what it might look like. Billed as one of the most energy efficient and responsive power plants in the nation, the new 550-MW El Segundo Energy Center illustrates how far the power generation industry has come in the last 50 years. Nestled between a cliff and the Pacific Ocean in a well-known beach community, this advanced combined cycle plant consumes 30 percent less natural gas than the units it replaced and uses rapid-response technology to provide critical backup power for intermittent forms of generation such as wind and solar power. What's more, the project eliminates the need to use seawater for cooling the turbines. Instead, this two-unit plant uses 32 large horizontal fans to dry cool the machinery. As a result, the plant uses 90 percent less water than conventional water-cooled technology.<br/> <em>Photo courtesy: Siemens</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">To read the full article, click here: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/features/a-report-on-combined-cycle-projects-in-north-america.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Report on Combined Cycle Projects in North America</a></p> </div>

09 / 49

GE’s 9E gas turbine

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">GE says its 9E.03 heavy-duty gas turbine is capable of using more than 52 types of fuel and can switch fuels while running under full load. The 9E can operate at more than 52 percent combined cycle efficiency in a 2x1 configuration. In October 2014, GE signed a contract to provide four 9E gas turbines and one steam turbine for a new 750-MW combined cycle power plant in Sulaimaniyah to support the government’s goal of strengthening the electricity infrastructure in the Kurdistan region.<br><i> Photo courtesy: GE </i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/10/ge-to-supply-gas-turbines-for-750-mw-combined-cycle-power-project-in-iraq.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">GE to supply gas turbines for 750 MW combined-cycle power project in Iraq</a></p> </div>

10 / 49

Wind Turbines

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">WGE on Nov. 19 said it has successfully installed 25,000 wind turbines worldwide, increasing the company’s wind power capacity to more than 38,000 MW. The company said it has invested about $2 billion in wind power technology since 2002.<br><i> Photo courtesy: GE</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/11/ge-installs-25-000th-wind-turbine.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">GE installs 25,000th wind turbine</a></p> </div>

11 / 49

Gas Turbine O&M Practices

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Many of the gas plants now providing base load capacity were designed as peaking plants. They weren’t designed to withstand the wear and tear associated with the sustained operation of a base load facility. What’s more, the maintenance programs for these facilities weren’t developed to support the level of sustained operational reliability required for base load generation. As a result, power producers are revamping their maintenance plans for critical systems and components of combined cycle gas plants. Maintenance plans that reflect the actual operation of gas turbine generators will help the industry avoid expensive repairs and overhauls.<br /> <em>Pictured is Alstom’s GT24 gas turbine. <br />Photo courtesy: Alstom</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/03/under-stress-power-producers-reevaluate-o-m-procedures-as-capacity-factors-for-gas-fired-plants-skyrocket.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Under Stress</a></p> </div>

12 / 49

Wind Turbine Technology

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The difficulty with selecting the right technology is that not all wind turbines are created equal. They vary in size, performance, cost, reliability and appearance. However, as more players continue to enter the growing wind industry, a greater number of inexperienced developers are entering into multi-million dollar agreements for wind turbines based solely on name recognition or other reasons that are equally unrelated to long-term project viability. This article details five common mistakes that occur during wind turbine technology selection and strategies for choosing the best technology.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-3/features/the-lost-art-of-wind-turbine-technology-selection.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">The (Lost) Art of Wind Turbine Technology Selection</a></p> </div>

13 / 49

Under Construction

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The need for faster, more efficient and more flexible generation means America's reliance on natural gas, like it or not, will continue to grow.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Low-priced natural gas created by a boom in production, stricter environmental standards for coal-fired power plants, and the integration of increasing amounts of renewable power have led power producers to shutter substantial amounts of coal-fired and nuclear generation.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">About 60 GW of coal-fired generation in the U.S. will be retired by 2020 and about 35 GW of nuclear capacity will be retired by 2025, according to recent projections by Black & Veatch, a global engineering and construction firm serving the power generation sector. Much of that capacity will be replaced with power produced by low-cost, cleaner-burning natural gas. </p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-7/features/under-construction.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Under Construction</a></p> </div>

14 / 49

Kemper: A “Remarkable” Project

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Southern Co.’s Kemper County power plant, a 550-MW integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility in eastern Mississippi, will be the first large-scale coal plant in the U.S. to use carbon capture and storage technology. Kemper will convert lignite or brown coal into a cleaner burning syngas. Carbon dioxide and other impurities are then stripped from the gaseous fuel before it is burned. The resulting emissions are as low as those produced by a power plant fueled with natural gas. The captured CO2 will be piped 62 miles south, where it will be used for enhanced oil recovery. “Quite remarkable,” U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said after visiting the project in November 2013.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/departments1/opinion/a-remarkable-project.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A "Remarkable" Project</a></p> </div>

15 / 49

Steam Turbines

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Photo caption: Coal will remain the dominant source of power generation in the U.S. through 2035, according to the Department of Energy. To remain online for another 20 years, many of these coal-fired plants will require a steam turbine rehabilitation. Worn and tattered after decades of operation, many of the rotating components in the steam turbine must be replaced to extend the life of these coal-fired units.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-116/issue-11/features/steam-turbine-upgrades-boost-plant-reliability-efficiency.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Steam Turbine Upgrades Boost Plant Reliability, Efficiency</a></p> </div>

16 / 49

Clean Coal

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) are closing in on key improvements to an evolving energy technology known as chemical looping combustion (CLC), a process that can efficiently and economically reduce greenhouse gas emissions.<br><i> Photo courtesy: NETL</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-10/features/netl-research-zeroes-in-on-improving-chemical-looping-technology.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">NETL Research Zeroes in on Improving Chemical Looping Technology</a></p> </div>

17 / 49

Offshore Wind Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Three years ago, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded an investigative research team to conduct a national study on the feasibility for offshore wind integration into the U.S. grid. Three years later, the results are in, and the prospects are encouraging.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-10/departments/view-on-renewables/offshore-wind-study-offers-encouraging-prospects-for-u-s-coastlines.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Offshore Wind Study Offers Encouraging Prospects for U.S. Coastlines</a></p> </div>

18 / 49

Panda Sherman Power Plant

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">On Nov. 20, Panda Power Funds, Siemens (NYSE: SI) and Bechtel dedicated the 758-MW Panda Sherman Power Project in Sherman, Texas, two weeks ahead of schedule. Siemens supplied the thermodynamic cycle design and Power Island engineering for the combined cycle plant. Siemens also delivered two SGT6-5000F gas turbines, one SST6-5000 steam turbine, two SGen6-1000A generators, one SGen6-2000H generator, the SPPA-T3000 instrumentation and control system, the waste-heat-recovery boilers as well as two Benson heavy duct-fired heat recovery steam generators. A long-term service contract is included for the generation components. Bechtel provided project management, engineering, procurement, construction (EPC), startup services, and led the commissioning.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/11/bechtel-siemens-panda-power-funds-dedicate-sherman-power-project-in-texas.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Bechtel, Siemens, Panda Power Funds dedicate Sherman Power Project in Texas</a></p> </div>

19 / 49

Panda Temple

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Built on a 250-acre former sunflower field, the 758-MW Panda Temple combined cycle power plant is the first flex plant in Texas. As one of the cleanest natural gas-fired plants in the U.S. fleet, the facility operates at 57.5 percent overall efficiency and can synchronize to the grid in 10 minutes, reach an emissions-compliant 60-percent baseload in 20 minutes, and arrive at full power in an hour. The facility was delivered as a turnkey system in a project that brought together the efforts of EPC giant Bechtel and global OEM Siemens.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Siemens </i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/09/texas-panda-temple-combined-cycle-plant-up-and-running.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Texas’ Panda Temple combined cycle plant up and running</a></p> </div>

20 / 49

Mitsubishi Hitachi’s M501J Gas Turbine

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">Mitsubishi Hitachi’s M501J gas turbine is known for its higher firing temperatures and improved efficiency. The J-Series gas turbine is able to operate at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,600oC. The J-series gas turbine is the largest and most efficient gas turbine in the world, according to Mitsubishi Hitachi.<br /> <em>Photo courtesy: Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-6/features/a-bull-market-for-gas-turbines.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Bull Market for Gas Turbines</a></p> </div>

21 / 49

GE’s 9HA Gas Turbine

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">GE’s 9HA gas turbine offers up to 592 MW of output and can reach full capacity in less than 30 minutes. The 9HA is an air-cooled high efficiency turbine with firing temperatures exceeding 2600oF for 50Hz and 60Hz combined cycle power generation. The H-class gas turbine incorporates an aerodynamic 14-stage compressor and includes an advanced radial diffuser which, combined with the Dry Low NOx 2.6+Axial Fuel Staged combustion system, allows improved operation of the combustion liner and transition piece cooling.<br/><i>Photo courtesy: GE</i> </p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-9/features/gas-turbine-technologies-for-the-transition.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Gas Turbine Technologies for the Transition</a></p> </div> PSP31369-063, 9HA.01 Gas Turbine, Rotor on Half Shell, Case, People, Belfort, France, Europe, DI-3200x4900

22 / 49

Valves and Actuators

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Valves and actuators get little or no recognition. But their impact on power plant efficiency can be significant. Valves and actuators are critical in almost every aspect of power plant operations. They are used in a wide range of applications, including pollution control, feed water, cooling water, chemical treatment, bottom ash and steam turbine control systems. Power Engineering identifies several notable improvements in actuator technology.<br /><i> Photo courtesy: Rotork</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-8/features/valves-actuators.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Valves & Actuators</a></p> </div>

23 / 49

GE’s 7HA Gas Turbine

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">GE recently introduced the 7HA air-cooled gas turbine. The 7HA comes in two versions for the 60Hz market, the 7HA.01 and 7HA.02. The 7HA.01 is rated at 275 MW and the 7HA.02 is rated at 330 MW in a simple-cycle configuration, with each offering more than 41 percent efficiency. In a 1x1 combined-cycle configuration, the 7HA.01 is rated at 405 MW and the 7HA.02 is rated at 486 MW, with each offering more than 61 percent efficiency.<br /><em> Photo courtesy: GE</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-6/features/a-bull-market-for-gas-turbines.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Bull Market for Gas Turbines</a></p> </div>

24 / 49

Photo%201%20-%20501J%20Mitsubishi.JPG

25 / 49

Generator Sets

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">A fully remote controlled Guascor SFGLD 480 gen-set provided by Dresser-Rand to produce the 600kW output. Biogas from Storms Hog Farm is combusted in the engine/generator to produce enough power for nearly 300 average North Carolina homes. The new power plant has been operating at full capacity since June 2014.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Dresser-Rand</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/swine-waste-generates-electricity-in-north-carolina.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Swine Waste: Generates Electricity in North Carolina</a></p> </div>

26 / 49

Temporary Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">As unconventional oil and gas operations that require sophisticated temporary power solutions for water management continue to grow, the need for highly credible power providers will become more crucial. This article tells operators what they should consider when evaluating a temporary power provider for shale water management.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Aggreko</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/temporary-power-solutions-for-water-management-in-unconventional-oil-gas-exploration.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Temporary Power Solutions for Water Management in Unconventional Oil & Gas Exploration</a></p> </div>

27 / 49

A CEO’s Perspective

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;"><i>Power Engineering</i> sat down with Bill Johnson, Chief Executive Officer of the Tennessee Valley Authority and former Chairman and CEO of Progress Energy, for an exclusive interview about the future of TVA and the U.S. power generation market. A wide range of issues were covered in this eye-opening Q&A.<br><i> Photo courtesy: TVA</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-8/features/inside-the-tennessee-valley-authority.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Inside the Tennessee Valley Authority</a></p> </div>

28 / 49

The Clean Power Plan

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">EPA wants to use "commonsense" to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting electricity generation to more efficient, less polluting power plants. In theory, writing regulations with commonsense is a noble idea; in reality, EPA has created a recipe for a no-win scenario for utilities.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-10/departments/energy-matters/sticky-recipe-the-clean-power-plan.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Sticky Recipe: The Clean Power Plan</a></p> </div>

29 / 49

Energy Storage

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The market for large-scale energy storage technologies received a big boost in October 2013, when California adopted the nation’s first energy storage mandate. The measure requires the state’s investor-owned electric utilities to buy 1.3 GW of energy storage capacity by the end of 2020. The California mandate has accelerated the development of storage technologies and may yield a workable solution. The most promising technology is the lithium ion battery, a rechargeable battery used in electric vehicles. In September 2014, Southern California Edison unveiled plans to build one of the largest battery storage systems in the world. The $53 million project will use lithium ion batteries to store excess wind power.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Southern California Edison</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-10/features/poised-for-growth.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Poised for Growth</a></p> </div>

30 / 49

H.F. Lee

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The H.F. Lee power plant, a 920-MW combined cycle plant in North Carolina, began commercial operation in December 2012. The $700 million project, which was engineered and built by Kiewit and ITC, features three Siemens SGT6-PAC 5000F gas turbines with a rated capacity of 206 MW each. The plant can reach full capacity in about four hours, according to owner Duke Energy.<br> <i>Photo courtesy: Duke Energy</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/features/a-report-on-combined-cycle-projects-in-north-america.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">A Report on Combined Cycle Projects in North America</a></p> </div>

31 / 49

Steam Turbine Rehabs

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">Most of the electricity in the U.S. is produced by steam turbines. Worn and tattered after decades of operation, many of the rotating components in a steam turbine must be replaced to extend the life of the unit. The most common problem with aging coal-fired units involves erosion of the steam turbine’s blade path. More efficient blading will increase the steam output and improve the unit’s overall heat rate.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-5/features/full-steam-ahead.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Full Steam Ahead</a></p> </div>

32 / 49

Coal Ash Management

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">A wide range of proven ash conveying options are available to companies seeking to eliminate storing bottom ash in ponds. Power generators that still use ponds to store ash by-product have important choices to make as they look to replace wet systems with dry solutions. This article examines the solutions for power generators.<br><i> Photo courtesy: United Conveyor</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-2/abma-special-section/coal-ash-management-understanding-your-options.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Coal Ash Management: Understanding Your Options</a></p> </div>

33 / 49

Wind Turbine O&M

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Operations & Maintenance strategy is a high priority for every type of power generation facility, especially wind turbines. Good O&M planning can extend turbine lifetime, reduce costs and increase availability. A bad strategy can leave you dealing with expensive downtime due to out-of-action components and system malfunctions. <br><i>Photo courtesy: Alstom</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-10/features/protecting-wind-turbines-in-extreme-temperatures.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Protecting Wind Turbines in Extreme Temperatures</a></p> </div>

34 / 49

MATS Compliance

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">A wide variety of monitoring technologies exist that help EGUs comply with the Mercury Air and Toxics Standard (MATS). Facilities working toward MATS compliance will need several different monitoring instruments in operation by April 2015. Typically, it is necessary to install one monitoring instrument for each regulated element or compound emitted.b><i> Photo courtesy: Thermo Fisher Scientific<i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/mats-compliance-the-countdown-to-2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">MATS Compliance: The Countdown to 2015</a></p> </div>

35 / 49

Boiler Feed Water Dechlorination

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">In a typical power plant dechlorination application, the water treatment facility aims to produce water with undetectable levels of free chlorine. A dechlorination process is used to remove free chlorine compounds from the feed water. As an alternative to conventional methods, ultraviolet (UV) treatment can be used as a chemical-free dechlorination approach in boiler feed water applications. Researchers from Southern Co. and the Southern Research Institue explain this innovative process. Pictured is the technology installed during full-scal trial at Plant Bowen Water Research Center.<br /><i> Photo courtesy: Southern Research Institute</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/hydro-optic-uv-technology-for-boiler-feed-water-dechlorination.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Hydro-Optic UV Technology for Boiler Feed Water Dechlorination</a></p> </div>

36 / 49

Repowering Projects

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Driven by low natural gas prices, permitting efficiencies, and political and economic headwinds against coal-fired generation, many U.S. power producers are working to increase the capacity of their existing fossil-fuel facilities by “re-powering” them as combined-cycle gas-fired facilities. Contracts for these projects will require complex, customized provisions that identify and allocate responsibility for these risks, rendering any standard form greenfield EPC contract inadequate. There are several unique aspects and risks presented by re-powering projects.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-10/features/epc-agreements-for-re-powering-projects.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">EPC Agreements for Re-powering Projects</a></p> </div>

37 / 49

Coal Ash Management

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Proposed rules would require coal-fired power plants in the U.S. to eliminate wet ash handling and phase out surface impoundments, or ponds. Anticipating tougher standards, most power producers have already studied the cost of converting to dry bottom ash systems and are bracing for the regulatory changes. The potential market for dry bottom ash conversions is significant. Less than 1 percent of the nation’s coal-fired plants are equipped with dry bottom ash systems. More than 90 percent of bottom ash systems remain wet.<br/><em>Photo courtesy: United Conveyor</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-2/abma-special-section/coal-ash-handling-storage-shifting-direction.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Coal Ash Handling & Storage: Shifting Direction</a></p> </div>

38 / 49

Gas Turbines

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The fleet of Siemens’ H-class world-record gas turbines achieved a cumulative 100,000 equivalent operating hours at the end of September 2014. Forty of the H-class gas turbines have been sold worldwide as of Oct. 25, 2014. At that time, 11 of those machines were in successful commercial operation with a high degree of starting reliability and availability. This makes them the most successful H-class gas turbine on the world market, according to Siemens.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">To view the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/10/siemens-h-class-gas-turbine-reaches-100-000-eoh-across-entire-fleet.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">click here: Siemens H-Class gas turbine reaches 100,000 EOH across entire fleet</a></p> </div>

39 / 49

Flexible Coal

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The San Juan Generating Station in Waterflow, New Mexico, is comprised of four, pulverized coal boilers that are each firing New Mexico bituminous coal. As more renewable power is added to the grid, increasing the flexibility of coal-fired plants is an important priority for most power plant managers and utility executives. In this article, a management strategies expert examines the flexibility of today’s fleet of coal-fired plants and discusses several ways to increase the flexible generation of coal.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-9/features/improving-the-flexibility-of-coal-fired-power-plants.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Improving the Flexibility of Coal-Fired Power Plants</a></p> </div>

40 / 49

Siemens’ SGT6-5000F Gas Turbine

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"><p style="margin-left: 40px;">Siemens’ SGT6-5000F gas turbine is integrated with a single-pressure, non-reheat bottoming cycle. The 550-MW El Segundo Energy Center in California, which began commercial operation Aug. 1, 2013, features two SGT6-5000F turbines. <br /><em>Photo courtesy: Siemens</em></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-9/features/gas-turbine-technologies-for-the-transition.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Gas Turbine Technologies for the Transition</a></p> </div>

41 / 49

Emissions Control

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The Mercury Air and Toxics Standard (MATS) was finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and enacted into law last year. The MATS rule could cost the industry as much as $10 billion to comply, the EPA estimates. The MATS rule requires coal- and- oil-fired power plants to install maximum achievable control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD), baghouse filters, activated carbon injection (ACI), dry sorbent injection (DSI), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and electrostatic precipitators (ESP). In addition to mercury, the MATS rule also establishes limits on several hazardous air pollutants, including lead, arsenic, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride and dioxins/furans.<br/><i> Photo courtesy: Clyde Bergemann Power Group</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-3/features/moving-forward.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Moving Forward</a></p> </div>

42 / 49

Clean Water Act 316(b) Compliance

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Side-by-side testing of different traveling screens was performed at Alden Research Laboratory in Worcester, Mass. They offer power producers a way to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency’s 316(b) rule. After a decades-old legal battle between utilities and environmental groups, power plant owners are moving forward with plans to comply with the new regulation, which requires certain power plants to install the best available technology to minimize the mortality of fish and other aquatic life.<br><i> Photo Courtesy: EPRI</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-6/departments1/power-plant-profile/first-last-the-ultra-supercritical-coal-fired-turk.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">316(b): A New Technical and Implementation Challenge for Power Plants</a></p> </div>

43 / 49

The Ultra-Supercritical Coal-Fired Turk

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Firsts are rare. By definition, they come only once. Lasts are rare for the same reason. But rarest of all is that which is the first and last of its kind, like Doctor Frankenstein's hero-monster, doomed to be forever alone on the day it was born. AEP's ultra-supercritical coal-fired Turk power plant may prove to be one such rarity: a great technological leap forward unlikely to ever be repeated again in the United States.<br><i> Photo courtesy: American Electric Power</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-6/departments1/power-plant-profile/first-last-the-ultra-supercritical-coal-fired-turk.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">First & Last: The Ultra-Supercritical Coal-Fired Turk</a></p> </div>

44 / 49

Internal Combustion Engines

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Fast-reacting gas-fired power plants with combustion engines offer several advantages over conventional units powered by a gas turbine, including the ability to start in one minute and reach full load in less than five minutes. This article examines the benefits and cost of gas-powered generator sets.<br > <i>Photo courtesy: Wartsila</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-9/features/the-flexibility-of-internal-combustion-engines.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">The Flexibility of Internal Combustion Engines</a></p> </div>

45 / 49

Wind Turbine Maintenance

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Operations & Maintenance strategy is a high priority for every type of power generation facility, especially wind turbines. Good O&M planning can extend turbine lifetime, reduce costs and increase availability. A bad strategy can leave you dealing with expensive downtime due to out-of-action components and system malfunctions. <i>Power Engineering</i> examines the products and services that can enhance your O&M strategy.<br ><i> Photo courtesy: Alstom</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-1/features/wind-turbine-maintenance-protecting-your-investment.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Wind Turbine Maintenance: Protecting Your Investment</a></p> </div>

46 / 49

Nuclear Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Vogtle Unit 3 nuclear island, with Unit 3 cooling tower in the background.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Georgia Power</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/the-future-of-the-u-s-nuclear-industry-depends-on-collaboration.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">The Future of the U.S. Nuclear Industry Depends on Collaboration</a></p> </div>

47 / 49

Ivanpah

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System is the world’s largest utility-scale solar facility with a capacity of 392 MW. The Ivanpah project uses concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. CSP plants use giant “U” shaped mirrors to capture the sun’s energy throughout the day. The sunlight is reflected and concentrated onto a receiver, where the heat rises to about 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The heated transfer fluid inside the receiver is used to generate steam and electricity in conventional steam turbine.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Bechtel</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;">Click here to read the full article: <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-10/features/bechtel-uses-six-sigma-to-drive-performance-at-ivanpah-solar-facility.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Bechtel Uses Six Sigma to Drive Performance at Ivanpah Solar Facility</a></p> </div>

48 / 49

Southcentral Power Project

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Alaska's most efficient power plant began commercial operation in February 2013, serving customers in southcentral Alaska, including Anchorage. After 22 months of construction, the Southcentral Power Project was completed several months ahead of schedule at a cost of $359 million. Although the 183-MW combined cycle plant is small, it is equipped with three highly efficient aeroderivative gas turbines from General Electric. The GE LM6000PF turbines, rated at 48 MW each, were chosen for their fuel efficiency and their ability to reach full capacity in just minutes. The new plant consumes 25 percent less gas, cutting the utility's natural gas consumption by 3 billion cubic feet a year, which translates to significant savings in fuel costs. What's more, the plant emits 25 percent less CO2 and 95 percent less carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide. SNC-Lavalin designed and built the project. The project's 39-MW steam turbine was furnished by Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas.<br> <i>Photo courtesy: Chugach Electric</i></p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-3/departments1/power-plant-profile/southcentral-power-project-efficiency-in-central-anchorage.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Southcentral Power Project: Efficiency in Central Anchorage</a></p> </div>

49 / 49

Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237);" class="frame"> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center, a 585-MW plant that burns biomass and coal, is capable of burning up to 20 percent biomass in its boilers along with coal. The plant began commercial operations in July 2012. The plant was named best coal-fired project of the year at POWER-GEN International 2012 by the editors of <i>Power Engineering magazine</i>.</p> <p class="size" style="margin-left: 40px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-4/features/co-firing-with-biomass-a-look-at-the-virginia-city-hybrid-energy.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2014">Co-firing with Biomass: A Look at the Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center</a></p> </div>