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Power Engineering Photo of the Day

01 / 26

EPA’s Tailoring Rule

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Justice Scalia wrote that EPA's Tailoring Rule attempted to assert "newfound authority" to regulate millions of small sources, such as retail stores, offices, apartment buildings, shopping centers, schools, and churches, and to decide, on an-ongoing basis (without regard for the thresholds prescribed by Congress) which of those sources to regulate. "We are not willing to stand on the dock and wave goodbye as EPA embarks on this multiyear voyage of discovery," said Scalia. </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/departments/energy-matters/a-tailor-made-fit.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">A Tailor-Made Fit</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

02 / 26

316(b) Technical Challenges

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">This is the second of a two-part series on the implications of the Environmental Protection Agency’s 316(b) rule. After a decades-old legal battle between utilities and environmental groups, power plant owners are moving forward with plans to comply with the new regulation, which requires certain power plants to install the best available technology to minimize the mortality of fish and other aquatic life. Researchers at the Electric Power Research Institute examine the new rule. <i>Photo courtesy: Atlas Manufacturing Company Inc.</i> </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/316-b-technical-challenges.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">316(b) Technical Challenges</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

03 / 26

Boundary Dam CCS Project

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">After 41 months of construction, the opening of the Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Storage Project marked a major milestone in the battle against climate change. The $1.35 billion project in Saskatchewan is the first large-scale power plant in the world to use CCS technology… Ninety percent of Unit 3’s CO<sub>2</sub> emissions are removed, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 1 million tons a year. During construction, which lasted three long winters, more than 60 contracting companies and several hundred subcontractors worked on the project. At the peak of construction, the project employed 1,700 workers. The entire world is watching SaskPower’s Boundary Dam project to determine if CCS can be an effective and affordable tool to combat climate change. In addition to sharply lower emissions, the CO<sub>2</sub> from Boundary Dam’s Unit 3 is stored underground and will be used for enhanced oil recovery. CO<sub>2</sub> emissions from Unit 3 are well below Canada’s standards for greenhouse gas emissions and well below the emission levels of the best gas-fired power plant. Congratulations to SaskPower for completing this challenging project and demonstrating how CCS technology can turn coal-fired power into an effective tool to reduce climate change.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/10/saskpower-successfully-captures-carbon-dioxide-delivers-to-oilfield.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">SaskPower successfully captures carbon dioxide, delivers to oilfield</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 21px;" align="center"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/slideshow/2014/09/power-engineering-daily-photos.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more photos</a></p> </div>

04 / 26

Fox Energy Center

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) has requested permission to build a $517 million, 400-MW natural gas-fired generating unit at its Fox Energy Center in Wrightstown. The site is home to two units that have a capacity of 593-MW. According to WPS, the additional unit is needed to keep up with demand, which is expected to rise by 2019 due to unit retirements in Wausau, Green Bay and Sheboygan.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015/01/wps-seeks-approval-to-build-517mn-gas-fired-generating-unit.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">WPS seeks approval to build $517Mn gas-fired generating unit</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

05 / 26

GE%E2%80%99s 9E gas turbine.jpg

06 / 26

GE%E2%80%99s%209E%20gas%20turbine.jpg

07 / 26

Gas Turbine Air Filtration

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Proper air filtration is critical to the overall performance and reliability of gas turbines. Fuel costs approach 80 percent of the life cycle cost of electricity. Small gains in efficiency can mean huge savings. This article investigates the decision criteria required in selecting an optimum air filtration solution, with the goal of maximizing gas turbine availability and lowering operating costs. Through case studies and analysis, essential filter parameters and their impact on gas turbine operations and maintenance are reviewed. <i>Photo courtesy: GE Power & Water</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/features/gas-turbine-air-filter-system-optimization.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Gas Turbine Air Filter System Optimization</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

08 / 26

Renewable Integration

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">A new report finds that, with good system planning, sound engineering practices, and commercially available technologies, the Western Interconnection can withstand the crucial first minute after grid disturbances with high penetrations of wind and solar on the grid.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The report by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and GE Energy Consulting is titled The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 (WWSIS-3)-Frequency Response and Transient Stability Study. <i>Photo courtesy: Gamesa</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/features/the-western-grid-can-weather-disturbances-under-high-renewable-penetrations.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">The Western Grid Can Weather Disturbances Under High Renewable Penetrations</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

09 / 26

Gas Generators and Engines

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The natural gas generator market is growing at an unprecedented rate. The market for natural gas generators is expected to explode to nearly $10 billion between 2013 and 2018. A boom in the production of unconventional gas resources and tightening regulations limiting stationary generator emissions will boost the market for gas generators and gas engines over the next decade. This article examines the benefits of natural gas engines and generators.<i> Photo courtesy: HIPOWER SYSTEMS</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/what-s-fueling-the-fire.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">What's Fueling the Fire?</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

10 / 26

Policy & Regulations

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The U.S. power sector is facing a host of new rules and regulations governing air emissions, water intake structures, coal ash storage, and discharge limits for effluent. Here is a recap of a few of the regulations that will affect the power generation industry for years to come.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-12/features/navigating-the-promises-and-pitfalls-of-environmental-regulations.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Navigating the Promises and Pitfalls of Environmental Regulations</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

11 / 26

Better Heat Rates

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">For a coal-fired plant, fuel is by far the largest expense item, amounting to about 55 to 75 percent of total plant costs. Coal costs $1.50 – 2.00 per million per Btu, or about $30 a ton. The heat content of coal ranges from of 8,000 to 12,000 Btu/lb. Reducing a power plant's heat rate can significantly lower fuel consumption and expense. At a typical 500 MW plant operating at 80 percent capacity factor and firing $2.00/MBtu bituminous coal, a 1-percent heat rate reduction will save about $700,000 in annual fuel costs. <i>Photo courtesy: Westar Energy</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/range-and-applicability-of-heat-rate-improvements.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Range And Applicability Of Heat Rate Improvements</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

12 / 26

A Report Card on EPC firms

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">In partnership with <i>Power Engineering</i> magazine, Flaspöhler Research Group of Kansas City performed an eye-opening survey of 64 key power generation executives to measure the utilization, performance and perceptions of engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) firms serving the power generation industry. Thirty two EPC firms were evaluated. In addition to gauging the performance of EPC firms, this report also examines the level of construction activity (retrofits/expansions) power producers are planning in the next few years. Over one-half of executives we spoke to indicated they are "Very likely" to initiate work toward the retrofit of an existing plant in the next 1 to 3 years. <i>Photo courtesy: Southern Company</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-12/features/epc-firms-are-they-meeting-the-needs-of-power-generators.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">EPC Firms: Are they Meeting the Needs of Power Generators?</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

13 / 26

Sustainable Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">President Barack Obama, Col. Dave Belote, former 99th Air Base Wing commander, and Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., tour the Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada photovoltaic array less than two years after it was commissioned into operation. With more than 72,000 solar panels spread across 140 acres of base property, the 15-MW generating operation saves the base more than $1 million a year in energy costs. <i>Photo courtesy: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Nadine Y. Barclay</i> </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/battle-ready-built-right-air-force-seeks-partnerships-to-develop-reliable-and-sustainable-energy-sources.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Battle Ready, Built Right: Air Force Seeks Partnerships to Develop Reliable and Sustainable Energy Sources</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

14 / 26

Natural Ventilation

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Power plants generate a lot of heat. Removing that heat is vital to the operation of power plant equipment and the safety of employees. Natural ventilation could be a suitable solution for many power plants, which produce enough heat to exploit the benefits of natural ventilation. In this contributed article, experts will examine natural ventilation technology and the benefits of this innovative concept. <i>Photo courtesy: Moffitt Corp.</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/features/the-use-of-natural-ventilation-for-power-plants.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">The Use of Natural Ventilation for Power Plants</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

15 / 26

Combined Heat and Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Combined Heat and Power systems are one of today’s most efficient, reliable and cost-effective approaches to electricity and thermal energy generation, providing smart solutions for businesses seeking to control heating, lighting and cooling costs. CHP is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat from the same fuel source. For energy users with high thermal loads, consistent electric and thermal energy requirements and around-the-clock operations, CHP technology is a desirable solution. In addition to cost-effectiveness, CHP systems provide benefits that not only serve the individual facility of service, but also reach the communities in which they operate by offering large-scale energy efficiency improvements.<i> Photo courtesy: Curtis Engine</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-12/features/maryland-s-newest-casino-takes-a-creative-approach-to-power.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Maryland's Newest Casino Takes a Creative Approach to Power</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

16 / 26

Generator Sets

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">A fully remote controlled Guascor SFGLD 480 gen-set provided by Dresser-Rand to produce the 600kW output. Biogas from Storms Hog Farm is combusted in the engine/generator to produce enough power for nearly 300 average North Carolina homes. The new power plant has been operating at full capacity since June 2014.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Dresser-Rand</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/swine-waste-generates-electricity-in-north-carolina.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Swine Waste: Generates Electricity in North Carolina</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

17 / 26

Biogas

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Six one-million-gallon anaerobic digesters were installed at Rock Creek Dairy to process manure, mitigate odors and extract methane to convert to electric power. Approximately 200,000 gallons of cow manure are collected daily, pumped through a nearly mile-long pipeline to the anaerobic digesters, and processed into clean compost. It is the largest facility of its kind in the western U.S. <i>Photo courtesy: Caterpillar Electric Power</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-117/issue-10/features/boosting-efficiency-and-lowering-emissions-with-biogas-to-energy-project.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Boosting Efficiency and Lowering Emissions with Biogas-to-Energy Project</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

18 / 26

The Debate over Distributed Generation

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The growing use of distributed generation is cutting into utilities' profits and their ability to pay for the up-keep of power lines, substations and generation equipment. The result: Higher rates for consumers and more customers leaving the grid. The blogosphere is ablaze with dark narratives that place utilities in an economic "death spiral" created by advancements in DG and consumer demand for cleaner homegrown energy. John Easton, vice president of International Programs for the Edison Electric Institute and a former assistant secretary for the Department of Energy, said the predictions of a utility death spiral are farfetched. <i>Photo courtesy: Curtis Engine</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/departments/opinion/the-debate-over-distributed-generation.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">The Debate over Distributed Generation</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

19 / 26

Who Will Replace Power’s Aging Work Force?

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">By most accounts, the power sector will need more than 100,000 new skilled workers by 2018 to replace those retiring workers. But attracting new talent has become an arduous undertaking as the industry faces a shortage of qualified workers and increased competition for college graduates. The Nuclear Energy Institute estimates that 39 percent of the nuclear work force will be eligible for retirement by 2018, which means the industry must hire 20,000 new workers over the next four years to replace them. Is the power generation industry prepared to compete with other industries for a new generation of skilled workers? What's more, does the industry have a plan for training and knowledge sharing?</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-12/departments/opinion/who-will-replace-the-industry-s-aging-work-force.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Who Will Replace the Industry's Aging Work Force?</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

20 / 26

On-Site Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The University of Wisconsin Madison rebuilt its on-site power plant, switching from coal to natural gas in the process. This article examines the unique challenges faced by both the owner and the contractor selected for the $150 million project. <i>Photo courtesy: The Boldt Company</i> </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/on-site-power-conversion.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">On-Site Power Conversion</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

21 / 26

The Tortoise and the Hare

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Expectations about a nuclear renaissance pop up every few years in response to one stimuli or another, only to be tamped down by the reality of economics or politics or public perception. Many people equate a "nuclear renaissance" with an intense level of new construction. That's not the way to look at it.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/departments/nuclear-reactions/the-tortoise-and-the-hare.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">The Tortoise and the Hare</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

22 / 26

Watts Bar

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Construction of TVA's new nuclear plant, Watts Bar Unit 2, was well underway when Fukushima happened. The NRC order required operating plants to be in compliance within two operating cycles, but required construction permit plants like Watts Bar 2 to be in compliance before receiving an operating license. </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/departments/nuclear-reactions/setting-the-bar-at-watts-bar.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Setting the Bar at Watts Bar</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

23 / 26

Renewable Roundtable Discussion

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">The renewable energy industry has come a long way in relatively little time. The costs of renewable technologies continue to go down, while renewable capacities at many utilities continue to go up. Although, in many cases, renewable technology is mature and ready for utility-scale deployment, state and federal production and investment tax policies appear less evolved.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Such were the topics on the minds of the participants in this year's renewable roundtable, when <i>Power Engineering</i> talked with five renewable energy executives as they prepared to take on a new year in the industry.</p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/features/renewable-energy-roundtable-production-and-investment-tax-policy-to-be-a-top-priority-in-2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Renewable Energy Roundtable: Production and Investment Tax Policy to be a Top Priority in 2015</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

24 / 26

Nuclear Power

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Vogtle Unit 3 nuclear island, with Unit 3 cooling tower in the background.<br><i> Photo courtesy: Georgia Power</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-118/issue-11/features/the-future-of-the-u-s-nuclear-industry-depends-on-collaboration.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">The Future of the U.S. Nuclear Industry Depends on Collaboration</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

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2014 Projects of the Year

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Each year, power projects from around the world are recognized by the editors of <i>Power Engineering</i> and Renewable Energy World magazines. The winners of the 2014 Projects of the Year Awards were announced Dec. 8 at Disney's Odyssey Pavilion at EPCOT during POWER-GEN International. This year's winners reflect the industry's search for cleaner, more efficient sources of power generation and demonstrate new technologies that will help achieve those goals. Project winners showcased an international representation of excellence in the power generation industry. Winners ranged from the largest concentrating solar power project in the world to the first large-scale power plant equipped with carbon capture and storage technology. <i>Photo courtesy: Kansai Electric</i></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-119/issue-1/features/2014-projects-of-the-year.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">2014 Projects of the Year</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>

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POWER-GEN International 2014 Keynote Session

<div style="padding-bottom: 2em; padding-top: 2em; padding-right: 2em; background-color: rgb(231, 235, 237); border:1px solid rgba(5, 5, 5, 0.4); "> <p style="margin-left: 40px;">Coal’s long dominant role in U.S. power generation is steadily losing ground to natural gas, but coal isn’t going away anytime soon. This seemed to be one of the recurring themes among the keynote speakers at Power-Gen-International 2014 in Orlando, Florida. Left to right: Bob Perciasepe, president, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions; Kim Greene, executive vice president and chief operating officer, Southern Company; Russell Ray, editor-in-chief, Power Engineering; Mauricio Gutierrez, executive vice president and chief operating officer, NRG Energy; David Walsh, president and chief executive officer, Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas. </p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 16px;"> Click here to read the full article, <a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2014/12/u-s-coal-losing-power-business-dominance-but-not-going-away.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">U.S. Coal Losing Power Business Dominance but Not Going Away</a></p> <p style="margin-left: 40px; font-size: 18px;"><a href="http://www.power-eng.com/articles/2015.html?cmpid=PEDailyphoto2015">Click here for more Power Engineering Headlines</a></p> </div>