Coal

If only Brayton and Rankine could see how well their children are getting along. A marriage made in heaven, the synergy the combination of the Brayton and Rankine cycles bring to power generation is a whole that is certainly greater than the sum of its parts. The gas turbine combined cycle has become a very popular plant concept in the past 10 to 15 years and for obvious reasons. Efficient, clean and less costly to construct then most alternatives, combined-cycle plants offer a blend of operatio
Coal

Combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both
Coal

Florida Power & Light Co.?s (FP&L) St. Lucie power plant, a two-unit, 1,700-MW nuclear electric generating facility, selected Applied Radiological Control Inc. (ARC) for its turbine component cleaning project in preparation for non-destructive examination. The decision was made after extensive evaluation of cleaning principles and methods, non-destructive examination of metal substrates and a full-scale demonstration of ARC?s ultra high pressure (UHP) water-jetting process.
Coal

A Energy Ventures Analysis Inc. (EVA) study conducted for the Center Energy and Economic Development said that natural gas will be the preferred fuel for electric power generation in the 1990s. However, this will be reversed in the post-2000 period. EVA?s conclusion is that coal will become the dominant fuel as we enter the next century.
Coal

Anyone watching the gas turbine industry already knows that advancements in efficiency, output and emissions control are coming fast and furious. Federal, state and local regulations, the spotty demand for power, low capital requirements and fast construction cycles all have their effect on the demand for gas turbines. Manufacturers competing for sales realize that to maintain a viable presence in the market they must accelerate the product cycle and introduce new designs and technological innov
Coal

Members of a North Carolina church will move into their expanded church facility sooner than expected. An arrangement to provide much needed low cost landfill material made the project possible thanks to a cooperative effort of the New Covenant United Methodist Church?s building committee, Duke Power Co., and contractor Trans-Ash of Cincinnati, Ohio.