Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

Owensboro Municipal Utilities? (OMU) clean air project at its Elmer Smith Station is nearing completion. The newly installed scrubber system achieved first flue gas treatment on November 4, 1994 for Unit 1 and both units are now operational. The scrubber installation is part of the clean air project that OMU began at the two-unit, 441-MW coal-fired station in 1989 when Clean Air Act compliance was initiated.
Emissions

In the January, 1995, OEnvironmentally SpeakingO column of Power Engineering, we first mentioned the name of an organization worth knowing?The Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Reader response included a letter that told us of a new organization worth watching. About to begin operations at this writing, the new group was formed at the University of Wyoming in 1993. Known as The Institute for Environment and Natural Resource Research and Policy (IENRRP), the organization seeks to devel
Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

The Institute of Clean Air Cos. (ICAC), the national association of stationary source air pollution control companies, has released a revised version of its white paper, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Controls to Abate NOx Emissions. The paper, written by ICAC?s SCR Committee, provides information on the capabilities, limitations, applications and costs of SCR.
Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

The holiday season, just passed, provided a convenient time to pause, at least briefly, to take a fresh look at setting priorities for a more productive 1995. Priorities might have included expanding the list of potential sources for information or guidance in certain special areas of expertise. For example, power plant engineers, who oversee many facets of environmental protection, could gain benefits from research organizations that might not yet be universally known throughout the power gener
Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

Competition in electric power production and delivery has caused profound changes in the way we view our industry. A speaker from the Edison Electric Institute observed at a recent meeting that competition has pulled the rug out from under integrated resource planning. Cost-driven, cut-throat competitors are going to have little regard for some central planner?s notion of what kind of new capacity should be built. If central planners remain in control, then there will not be the kind of open ent