Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

Conemaugh Electric Generating Station Unit 1 is on line with a new flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system that is reducing the unit?s SO2 emissions by approximately 95 percent. The FGD went into service on Dec. 15, 1994, and a scrubber for Unit 2 should be complete this fall. Both scrubbers will cost approximately $341 million. The two-scrubber project will enable the 1,700-MW plant to meet the acid rain requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Conemaugh Station, operated by P
Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

When the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) declared combustion residue from power plants to be nonhazardous (which it is), a collective sigh of relief arose in the power generation industry. Then, when the attention turned to commercial boilers and their potential emissions of air toxics, it seemed, initially, that Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) might present little cause for concern at power plants. Not so.
Emissions

In the January, 1995, OEnvironmentally SpeakingO column of Power Engineering, we first mentioned the name of an organization worth knowing?The Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Reader response included a letter that told us of a new organization worth watching. About to begin operations at this writing, the new group was formed at the University of Wyoming in 1993. Known as The Institute for Environment and Natural Resource Research and Policy (IENRRP), the organization seeks to devel
Air Pollution Control Equipment Services

The Institute of Clean Air Cos. (ICAC), the national association of stationary source air pollution control companies, has released a revised version of its white paper, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Controls to Abate NOx Emissions. The paper, written by ICAC?s SCR Committee, provides information on the capabilities, limitations, applications and costs of SCR.