Entergy completes gas-fired 980-MW St. Charles Power Station

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(Photo of St. Charles Power Station courtesy of Entergy)

Entergy Louisiana’s new gas-fired St. Charles Power Station is now in commercial operation, ahead of schedule and within budget.

The 980-MW St. Charles plant is located in Montz, about 30 miles west of Entergy’s headquarter city of New Orleans. It is a combined-cycle gas turbine facility that should cut carbon dioxide emissions 40 percent below older gas-fired units, according to the utility.

“The St. Charles Power Station will supply reliable, clean energy to customers to help support the tremendous growth Louisiana is experiencing,” said Phillip May, president and CEO of Entergy Louisiana. “This combined-cycle plant is one part of our transformation to cleaner, more efficient generation. Replacing older, less efficient plants with new, cleaner natural gas units will improve system reliability, reduce environmental impacts and produce substantial customer savings over the long term.”

Because of the plant’s high efficiency, it is projected that customers will save more than $1.3 billion over the anticipated 30-year life of the unit. Customer savings are expected to exceed the plant’s construction cost in less than 10 years.

The company plans to officially dedicate the unit in a ceremony slated for July 15. At its peak, 955 workers were engaged in the construction of the unit. Entergy Louisiana employs 31 people to operate the plant.

The St. Charles Power Station is part of Entergy Corporation’s broader plan to modernize and transform the entergy utility’s existing generation fleet. Over the past 13 years, Entergy has added approximately 5,900 megawatts of clean, highly efficient combined-cycle gas turbine generation, allowing for the deactivation of more than 6,300 megawatts of older, less efficient gas or oil units.

Entergy owns and operates power plants with approximately 30,000 MW of generating capacity. Overall, the utility delivers electricity to 2.9 million utility customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.

 

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