Boilers, Coal, New Projects

Babcock & Wilcox building superheater parts for coal-fired Texas plant’s supercritical boiler

Photo courtesy Fluor.

Ohio-based power equipment manufacturer Babcock & Wilcox Thermal will supply new superheater components for a 10-year-old Texas coal-fired generation plant.

The superheater parts will go into the company’s universal pressure supercritical boiler at Luminant’s Oak Grove Power Plant near Franklin, Texas. B&W will design, make and supply the parts.

“Now more than ever, it’s important that plants continue to operate efficiently, and we’re proud to supply reliable, cost-effective technologies to help customers across a wide range of industries  meet emission standards,” said B&W Chief Operating Officer Jimmy Morgan. “We thank Luminant for the opportunity to supply components for this important boiler maintenance project.”

Luminant is a power generator owned by Vistra Energy.

Read more about coal-fired power in PE here

The universal pressure boilers are designed to operate at steam outlet temperatures of approximately 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit and at supercritical pressures.

Engineering is underway for the contract, which was awarded to B&W’s subsidiary, the Babcock & Wilcox Co. Components will be manufactured in B&W’s Monterrey, Mexico, facility.

Material delivery to Oak Grove is scheduled for February 2021.

B&W Universal Pressure boilers are designed to operate at highly efficient steam outlet temperatures of approximately 1100° F and at supercritical pressures. These high temperatures produce power with lower emissions than subcritical pressure boilers, according to the company.

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The two coal-fired units at Oak Grove have a combined capacity of about 1.79 GW and were commissioned in 2010 and 2011. Fluor was the engineering, procurement and construction contractor on the project.

At that time, its owners said the new plant had lower emission rates than any existing lignite plant in Texas and at least 70 percent lower than the national coal plant average, according to reports.

Most existing and operational coal-fired plants in the U.S. were built prior to the 1990s.

(Rod Walton is content director for Power Engineering, POWERGEN+ and POWERGEN International. He can be reached at 918-831-9177 and [email protected]).

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The Future of Coal-Fired Generation will a conference track during POWERGEN International, happening March 30-April 1 in Orlando, Florida.