Cogeneration, Gas, Gas Turbines, On-Site Power

U.S. Navy commissions vessel powered by MTU engines, GE turbines

The U.S. Navy commissioned its latest littoral combat ship (LCS) powered by MTU engines and GE turbines to defend the homeland beginning this weekend.

The USS Cincinnati moved into active duty from Gulfport, Miss. It is the 18th LCS to enter the Navy fleet, adding to the class of smaller, agile warships.

The vessel is powered by twin 12,200-horsepower MTU 20V8000 diesel engines and two 29,500-HP GE LM2500 gas turbines. The Cincinnati holds a crew of about 40 sailors and can move at 40 knots (46 MHP) in the water

The ship’s name honors that city in Ohio, which also happens to be the hometown of GE Aviation and the plant where the LM2500 marine gas turbines are manufactured. GE has delivered more than 700 LMG2500 turbines for the U.S. Navy.

On-site and marine power manufacturer MTU also builds numerous diesel engines for fast vessels such as LCS, corvettes and frigates. The 20V8000 can deliver about 10,000 kW in continuous power, according to a company website.

MTU, which is a unit of Rolls-Royce Power Systems, has built 20V8000 models for a number of naval vessels around the world.

The USS Cincinnati carries four 57-mm Mk 110 guns and a missile launcher onboard. It also has a landing pad for on-site support helicopters.

Austral USA, a subsidiary of the Australian shipbuilding company, constructed the Cincinnati in Mobile, Alabama and delivered it to the Navy last year.

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Experts from GE and MTU will be presenting content sessions on the power generation sector at POWERGEN International happening Nov. 19-21 in New Orleans. POWERGEN also includes a track focused on On-Site Power.

(Rod Walton is content director for Power Engineering and POWERGEN International. He can be reached at 918-831-9177 and [email protected]).