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Lower output Jenbacher engine launched

20 March 2006 – GE Energy has introduced two additions to its Jenbacher “Type 4” gas engine series offering lower output ranges and aimed at the on-site power and cogeneration markets.

GE developed its new J412 and J416 models to address a growing demand for higher efficiency gas engines in the output range of 800 kW to 1.2 MW.

The original Type 4 engine – the J420 GS – was developed to serve the higher 1.5-MW output segment. Since 2002, more than 250 J420 engines have been installed worldwide.

“With the addition of the new J412 and J416 engine models, our Jenbacher Type 4 series now provides a set of high efficiency options across the entire output range, from 800 kW to 1.5 megawatts,” said Barry Glickman, General Manager for GE’s Jenbacher gas engine division. “All Type 4 engine models are equipped with latest technical developments in ignition and combustion technology, ensuring high availability.”

The J412 and J416 began field trials in 2003. In total, seven field test engines accumulated more than 60 000 operating hours, while demonstrating high levels of efficiency and reliability.

Features of the J412 and J416 include enhanced ignition technology and Jenbacher-developed spark plugs; the TecJet gas-dosing valve, which offers a high degree of control accuracy; and a newly developed, high-efficiency combustion system with “Miller LIVC” technology. This technology system results in higher mechanical efficiency and improved fuel flexibility. The special equipment consists of a specially dimensioned cam shaft, high efficiency turbo charger and the rail ignition system with high reliability, even with very lean combustion.

The new engines are currently available at 50 Hz /1500 rpm and 60 Hz / 1,200 rpm. The J412 electrical and thermal outputs are 845 kW and 897 kW, while the J416’s outputs are 1127 kW and 1195 kW. The engines’ electrical efficiency is 42.7 per cent for the J412 and 42.8 per cent for the J416, with a minimum methane number of 85.

Engines build by GE’s Jenbacher division run on natural gas and various “specialty gases” created from landfills, coal mines, sewage sludge and industrial wastes.