Emissions, Renewables

LADWP Green Power program earns top national billing in new survey

LOS ANGELES, Calif., Sept. 26, 2001 — The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) Green Power for a Green LA program is one of the nation’s top 10 utility renewable energy programs, with the most customers, the highest capacity of renewable development and one of the best customer participation rates, according to the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), an affiliate of the U.S. Department of Energy.

In a comprehensive survey, NREL measured the success of the country’s green power programs and ranked them according to results on its four lists of “Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs.” The four evaluation categories included: total number of customer participants, customer participation rates, new renewables supported by green pricing and premium charged for new renewable energy development.

LADWP was ranked No.1 in the customer participants category with 80,000 customers — 65,000 customers more than the second ranked utility alone. (The program has grown since the survey completion to 90,000 customers.) The Department also placed first in the new renewable resources supported by green pricing category, delivering a capacity of 25 megawatts of wind power. (The program now delivers 30 megawatts of windpower). And with a 6.2 percent adoption rate, LADWP ranked second in the customer participation rate category.

“The LADWP is a strong advocate of green power initiatives and programs that drive adoption of renewable energy. It’s wonderful to see LA residents embrace these programs, and for the Department, the nation’s largest municipal utility, to be recognized by the NREL for having an active interest in the environment,” said LADWP General Manager David H. Wiggs.

The Green Power for Green LA program gives LADWP customers the opportunity to replace electricity from polluting power plants with energy generated from renewable resources like sun, wind and water. For a slightly higher price than power generated from conventional sources such as coal and oil, the program allows residential customers to choose 100 percent renewable energy with 20 percent coming from new sources. The Green Power for a Green LA Program has been offered since May 1999.

In addition, as part of its public benefits program, authorized by AB 1890, California’s electric utility restructuring act, LADWP offers a number of energy efficiency programs and incentives. In the last 12 months, LADWP-sponsored energy efficiency programs have resulted in achieved savings of 50 megawatts — enough energy to power 50,000 homes. Increased conservation efforts were made possible through enhanced incentives due to grant funds received from the California Energy Commission.

These programs and customers’ voluntary conservation efforts have resulted in reduced energy usage of eight percent this summer, adjusted for weather.

“Our strong and growing Green Power customer participation rate illustrates LA’s commitment to clean energy,” said Angelina Galiteva, LADWP’s director of strategic — planning. “LADWP’s business and residential customers alike have taken a personal stake in renewable energy and set the standard for conserving precious natural resources.”

According to the NREL, more than 85 utilities have implemented or announced intentions to develop green pricing programs for their customers. Customer participation in these programs has resulted in the installation of more than 110 megawatts of new renewable resources, with firm development plans for another 172 megawatts.

About Green LA and LADWP

LADWP’s Solar Power, Energy Efficiency and Green Power initiatives are all part of the Green LA Program that also includes the Cool Schools Tree Planting effort, Electric Transportation and Recycling activities. For more information about the LADWP’s Green LA Programs log on to www.GreenLA.com or phone 1-800-GreenLA.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power serves more than 3.8 million people in Los Angeles and was established almost 100 years ago to provide water and electric needs to the city’s businesses and residents.